Folklore, Oral Tradition and Culture Studies |

The University of Missouri-Columbia |

Program Description
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CORE FACULTY:

These faculty are full time Folklore faculty; they design the core courses and the program, the Ph.D. reading lists, write and grade comprehensive exam questions, and chair folklore graduate student committees.
NOTE: Faculty profiles, photos, course offerings, and publications are available on the University of Missouri website, www.missouri.edu, on departmental websites.

Elaine J. Lawless

Elaine J. Lawless
Curators’ Distinguished Professor, English and Women’s and Gender Studies; Director, Folklore Program; Past President, American Folklore Society. Areas include: Women’s folklore, religious folklore and belief, narrative, domestic violence, performance studies, ethnographic writing.

John Miles Foley

John Miles Foley

We grieve the passing of John Miles Foley (1947-2012).


Curators’ and Byler Professor, English and Classics. Director, Center for Studies in Oral Tradition; Editor, Oral Tradition; Director, Center for e-Research. Areas include: Oral Tradition, Beowulf, Chaucer, classics.

Prof. Sw. Anand Prahlad

Sw. Anand Prahlad
Professor, English, Poetry, and Black Studies.
Areas include: African American folklore and poetry, film, creative writing, postcolonial theory, creative nonfiction, fetish, humor, cultural diversity and academics.

LuAnne RothLuanne Roth
Assistant Teaching Professor, English Department.
Areas include: American folklore and culture, foodways,film, material culture, feminist, postcolonial and critical race theories.

 

 

 

Joanna Hearne Joanna Hearne
Associate Professor, English. Areas include: Film studies, Native American studies and folklore, with research interests in Indigenous media, Western and documentary film genres, ethnographic film, animation, early cinema and issues of ethnicity in history.

Lisa L. Higgins and Deborah Bailey Lisa L. Higgins, Director, Missouri Folk Arts Program
Deborah Bailey, Folk Arts Specialist at the Missouri Folk Arts Program.The Missouri Folk Arts Program is a program of MU’s Museum of Art and Archaeology and the Missouri Arts Council. Lisa and Debbie supervise graduate student internships and graduate student research assistantships in public folklore. Lisa recieved her PhD from the University of Missouri in May 2008. Her research areas include: women’s oral narratives; festival; arts administration; and public arts policy. Debbie’s areas include: women’s religious traditions; material culture; and new immigrant and refugee arts. For information about the Missouri Folk Arts Program, see http://maa.missouri.edu/mfap/

ASSOCIATE FACULTY:

These faculty regularly offer courses of particular interest to folklore students; cross-list their courses with English/Folklore Studies; and serve on graduate committees, often writing and grading exam questions for individual graduate students.

Robert "Bob" Baum

Robert "Bob" Baum
Associate Professor, Religious Studies. Areas include: African religious history, particularly West African prophetic movements; oral traditions, indigenous religions and Islam.

Richard "Chip" Callahan

Richard "Chip" Callahan
Associate Professor, Religious Studies. Areas include: religious folklore and folklife, American religious culture, maritime studies, occupational cultures, New England, Appalachia, ethnographic history, haunting.

M. Heather Carver

M. Heather Carver
Associate Professor, Performance Studies/Theater. Areas include: performance studies, authethography, autobiography, performative writing.

Karen Piper

Karen Piper
Associate Professor, English. Areas include post-colonial theory, diasporic literature, creative nonfiction, environmental writing.



J. Sanford "Sandy" Rikoon

J. Sanford "Sandy" Rikoon
Professor, Rural Sociology. Areas include: rural culture, sustainable agriculture, material culture, rural life, poverty food security, intellectual property rights.


Kristin Schwain

Kristin Schwain
Associate Professor, Art History and Archeology. Areas include: American art and culture, popular culture, material culture, American photography, material culture of religion, visual culture.



AFFILIATED FACULTY:

These faculty have expressed an interest in the Folklore Studies program, courses, and students. They regularly teach courses that may be of particular interest to our students.

Mamadou Badiane

Mamadou Badiane
Associate Professor of Hispanic Studies, Romance Languages and Literatures. Areas include: Afro-Caribbean people and culture in literature, the poetics of Negrismo and Negritude, national identities, Creolite. Teaches courses in Spanish.

Vicki Carstens
Associate Professor, English; Chair of the Linguistics Program. Areas include: linguistics, African languages and linguistics, Bantu, Noam Chomsky.

Juanamaria Cordones-Cook

Juanamaria Cordones-Cook
Associate Professor of Spanish, Afro-Romance Languages and Literatures. Areas include: Spanish American literature and critical theory, Afro-hispanic and Afro-Cuban literature and poetry, visual culture, culture and politics, theatre and postcolonial identity.

John Evelev
Associate Professor, English. Areas include: American literature and culture theory, travel narratives, popular culture, political culture, aesthetics, theatre and social crisis, New England, cultural geography.

Matthew Gordon

Matthew Gordon
Associate Professor, English. Areas include: linguistics, socio-linguistics, phonology, slang, regional and social dialects.


April Langley

April Langley
Associate Professor, English and Black Studies. Areas include: 28th and 19th Africana and American literature and poetry, post-colonial theory, black aesthetics, poetics and oral traditions.


Chris Okonkwo

Chris Okonkwo
Associate Professor, English and Black Studies. Areas include: African and Africana literature, African diaspora, African American fiction, post-colonial theory.


Stephanie Shonekan

Stephanie Shonekan
Assistant Professor, Ethnomusicology and Black Studies. Areas include: African and African Diaspora music, literature and culture, black women and life writing, hip hop, world music, film, parallels between the literature and music of Africa and the African Diaspora.




Current Folklore and Oral Tradition
GRADUATE STUDENT INSTRUCTORS AND INTERNS:

NOTE: The University of Missouri offers a wide variety of teaching opportunities for graduate students in folklore, including teaching several different levels/courses in writing and composition, introductory folklore courses, and topics courses designed around their own particular interests. The following students currently teach folklore courses in the program or will be teaching them in the near future, including 1700 Introduction to Folklore Genres; 2700 Introduction to Folklore Fieldwork; and other topics courses as available.

Constance Bailey

Constance Bailey
Ph.D. candidate, 20th century African American literature and Folklore. Areas include literature of the African Diaspora, post-colonial literature, humor, and 19th century American literature.

London Brickley
MA/Ph.D. student, Folklore. Areas include: Folklore and media studies, Scandinavian studies, bioethics.

Darcy Holtgrave

Darcy Holtgrave
Ph.D. candidate, Folklore. Areas include narrative studies, social justice, public sector folklore, ethnographic writing, and creative non-fiction. Associate Editor for the International Society of Studies in Oral Tradition.

 

Heather Johnson Ph.D. student, Folklore. Areas include: folk belief, material culture and folk art, folk medicine and medieval studies.

Jackson Medel PhotoJackson Medel
Ph.D. student, Folklore. Areas include: recreational folklore, ethnographic fieldwork and writing, folklore and literature, electronic media, environmental ethics. Jenni Headshot Jennifer Spitulnik


 

 

Jennifer Spitulnik's research interests include folklore and folkllfe, ethnography and ethnographic texts, performance studies film studies, women and gender studies, online participatory cultures, and online networks. Jennifer holds an MA in folklore from George Mason University and a B. Music in voice performance from Oberlin College Conservatory of Music.

Raymond Summerville
Ph.D. student, Folklore, African Diaspora Studies. Areas include: Ethnographic representation, folk belief.




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